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Top 10 Best of Chris Morris

VO: Richard Bush
Written by Richard Bush Subtle, isn’t in this guy's vocabulary. He say’s it like it is. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’re counting down the best of Chris Morris. For this list, we’re celebrating the renowned satirist Christopher Morris by looking at his most revered and controversial works. Just to be clear, although Morris has a healthy back catalogue of radio and music credits, we’re focussing on his film and TV work today, with titles he has either appeared in or was instrumental in writing, directing or editing. Special thanks to our user RichardFB for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Best of Chris Morris


Subtle, isn’t in this guy's vocabulary. He say’s it like it is. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’re counting down the best of Chris Morris.

For this list, we’re celebrating the renowned satirist Christopher Morris by looking at his most revered and controversial works. Just to be clear, although Morris has a healthy back catalogue of radio and music credits, we’re focussing on his film and TV work today, with titles he has either appeared in or was instrumental in writing, directing or editing.

#10: “Veep” (2012-)


It may seem strange for Morris to be involved in an American TV series, but the foundations of “Veep” lay surprisingly close to home. Based on the British sitcom “The Thick of It”, which features a potty-mouthed Peter Capaldi, it’s lathered in political humour. Morris is credited with directing several of the show’s episodes, of which are penned by his former collaborator Armando Iannucci. As a result, a familiar comedic flair is clearly evident.

#9: “Stewart Lee's Comedy Vehicle” (2009-2016)


A diverse, intelligent series fronted by comedian Stewart Lee and featuring a mish-mash of stand-up, sketches and shorts, Morris was brought onto "Comedy Vehicle" as a script-editor. He also features as the show’s famed interrogator from series 3 onwards, a character that dissects Lee’s comedy and quizzes him about it. His left field, often surreal gags can clearly be detected throughout the series and his scenes with Lee are gold.

#8: “I’m Alan Partridge” (1997-2002)


For someone who routinely throws conformism out the window, Morris is pretty good at playing it straight. Case in point, this little cameo in Steve Coogan’s Alan Partridge series. Appearing on Partridge's radio show to discuss offensive comments made by the host, Morris plays the leader of the local Farmer’s Union, with a few choice words for the DJ. As always, Partridge pokes and prods and further enrages his guest - and Morris is brimming with articulate retorts to put the guy in his place.

#7: “Four Lions” (2010)


His first foray into feature-length films, but one that earned him a BAFTA. In true Chris Morris fashion, “Four Lions” takes something highly-contentious - in this case terrorism - and satirises it to the extreme. Written and directed by Morris, the comedy focuses on a group of radicalised young British Muslims who aspire to be suicide bombers. There’s a fair tew taboo takes on some pretty serious topics - from bomb making to religious stereotypes - but somehow, Morris manages to hit just the right note.

#6: “The IT Crowd” (2006-2013)


Another sitcom appearance, this time as part of the ensemble cast that makes up Graham Linehan’s brilliant “IT Crowd”. Playing the office big-wig and head of Reynholm Industries, Morris’ Denholm Reynholm is loud-mouthed, over-driven and a little bit psychotic. Constantly giving his employees a hard time and struggling to understand office etiquette, or how computers work, he steals each and every scene he’s in. For anyone who ever doubted Morris’ draw in front of camera, observe.

#5: “My Wrongs 8245–8249 & 117” (2002)


This was Chris’ first crack at film, albeit a short film, and it proved that he didn’t need an entire series, lengthy set-up or 90 minutes to tell a compelling, mind-bending story. A psychological tale that sees Paddy Considine play a mentally disturbed man who thinks his dog is talking to him, it’s strangely surreal from start to finish. Winning a BAFTA award for his efforts, Morris wrote, directed and even lent his voice to the short’s devious Dobermann.

#4: “Nathan Barley” (2004)


The epitome of a show ahead of its time, “Nathan Barley” took the mick out of hipsters before they even knew they were hipsters. A collaboration between Morris and Charlie Brooker, it critiqued the creeping influence of the internet and numerous fashion and social trends. Serving up spot on observational humour, which would only really strike a chord with viewers years later, it starred the likes of Julian Barratt, Richard Ayoade, Ben Whishaw and Noel Fielding.

#3: “Jam” (2000)


“Jam” took things to another level. It turned dark, disturbing sketch comedy up to 11, and then kept going. Based on the radio series “Blue Jam”, which Morris created a few years earlier, everything about the show was unsettling, from its humorous yet highly-controversial routines, to the fact that some of the sketches feature unnerving overdubbed audio from the original radio show. Written by, directed by and starring Morris, along with some sketch comedy regulars, “Jam” is difficult to watch, yet you just can’t look away.

#2: “The Day Today” (1994)


To another radio-inspired series and the show that catapulted Morris into the TV limelight. “The Day Today” parodies popular news programmes with bogus stories, memorable characters and a deadpan delivery. Morris was just one of many genius comedy minds involved in its creation, but he helped bring numerous news correspondents to life and, as the show’s key anchor, served up some of the biggest laughs, seamlessly linking to different segments and presenters, such as Collaterlie Sisters and of course, Coogan’s Alan Partridge.

#1: “Brass Eye” (1997-2001)


Airing a few years after “The Day Today” and ultimately acting as a follow up, “Brass Eye” became its own creature, refining Morris and co.’s already well-established mock news format. Taking a more focussed approach to big topics, such as drugs, sex and science, it’s as controversial and revolutionary as comedy can get. Arguably hitting its cringeworthy heights with a 2001 special entitled "Paedogeddon!", it is without doubt one of the most important blueprints in satirical comedy to date.
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