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Top 10 Good British Movies with a Bad Rotten Tomatoes Score

VO: Richard Bush WRITTEN BY: Robert Barnott Palin
Do you ever feel like critics get it wrong? Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today, we’ll be counting down our picks for Top 10 Good British Movies with a Bad Rotten Tomatoes Score. For this list, we’re running with a score threshold of 60% - as recorded on the popular review website, Rotten Tomatoes. For every entry, the critics score falls below 60%, but the audience score soars above it. As well as this, we’re looking at movies which have gone on to become popular cult classics, despite unfavourable reviews. Special thanks to our user RichardFB for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Good British Movies with a Bad Rotten Tomatoes Score


Do you ever feel like critics get it wrong? Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today, we’ll be counting down our picks for Top 10 Good British Movies with a Bad Rotten Tomatoes Score.

For this list, we’re running with a score threshold of 60% - as recorded on the popular review website, Rotten Tomatoes. For every entry, the critics score falls below 60%, but the audience score soars above it. As well as this, we’re looking at movies which have gone on to become popular cult classics, despite unfavourable reviews.

#10: “The Football Factory” (2004)

What kind of a WatchMojo UK, hate-to-love style movie list would this be if we didn’t include a Danny Dyer film? Based on a book trilogy by John King, “The Football Factory” scored a Rotten Tomatoes audience rating of 83% - which almost doubles the critic score of just 43%. The film’s lack of critical acclaim was down in part to its laddishness and glorified violence, but these were probably the very reasons for its popularity with the movie-going masses. If there is a standard-setter for football hooligan films, then it’s this.

#9: “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” (2017)

This historical romp just wasn't able to siege the stony hearts of the critics. Unconvinced by the now oh-so notorious David Beckham cameo, reviewers dismissed “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” as messy and a bit ridiculous, grading it at just 31%. Audiences, on the other hand, apparently enjoyed its trademark Guy Ritchie fast cuts and high-octane drama. To be fair, what’s not to love about giant snakes and elephants, a furious Jude Law, and tons of CGI? It is truly a modern twist on an old, classic tale.

#8: “Run Fatboy Run” (2007)

A marathon movie rather than a movie marathon, this Simon Pegg sports story left critics feeling rather exhausted, achieving a lowly 46%. The general public seem to disagree, however, warming to its heart-filled message and moments of comedy brilliance. There’s even a smattering of gross-out included, for fans of that kinda stuff. Hank Azaria, better known as the surly bartender Moe Szyslak (as well as many other characters) from “The Simpsons”, plays a worthy foe… And the delightfully deadpan humour, and bare-faced cheek, of Dylan Moran give it an extra dimension. Maybe critics were simply disappointed that it wasn't the much-anticipated closing chapter to the Cornetto trilogy?

#7: “Mamma Mia” (2008)

Starring Meryl Streep and Pierce Brosnan, amongst many other high-profile stars, Rotten Tomatoes critics mostly slammed this production, claiming that it feels forced and hard to watch. Gaining 66% with audiences, though - 11% higher than what critics gave it – real-life film goers seem to love its unapologetic, ultra-kitsch flamboyance. Packed full of ABBA’s greatest hits joyfully sung and choreographed by the cast, it is, in essence, a fun and definitely not-so serious watch. And that’s despite a former James Bond’s questionable vocals, which left most of us shaken, stirred and scratching our heads.

#6: “St. Trinian’s” (2007)

Featuring a who’s who of mid-noughties British actors and celebrities, professional reviewers couldn’t quite see past the high jinx and crudeness of the “St. Trinian’s” style of humour. Although, it appears that for every cynical critic, there are several satisfied audience members. Clearly, the film is pretty tongue in cheek from the outset, and as an anarchic boarding school comedy, it is pretty much on the money. With plenty of cliques, chaos and cameos, including a gothic Paloma Faith and an academic Russell Brand, it’s constantly fun and never attempts to be anything other than that.

#5: “Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason” (2004)

The second instalment of this Renée Zellweger rom-com caused a ripple of discontent amongst film critics, so much so that its rating, rather surprisingly, is only at 27%. Its audience is obviously far more loyal to the franchise, however, scoring it a much higher 60%. Some of the stuffier reviewers thought “Edge of Reason” to be a sub-par follow up… But it seems to pick up fairly well from where the first film left off, with Bridget’s loveable awkwardness and eccentricity. Plus, it couldn’t have been that bad if a third instalment was eventually made which, in fairness, was far better received.

#4: “Johnny English” (2003)

If you hate this film, then chances are, you’re a film critic. Slated by many as being a trite 007 parody, it drew multiple comparisons to “Austin Powers”, with the general consensus being that Mike Myers did it much better. But if you look past its worn parody cliches, you will see that “Johnny English” enthusiastically embraces its exaggerated Britishness and loveable silliness. Since its release, it has been shown on TV countless times and has even been given two sequels, which speaks for itself. Plus, in addition to the genius of Rowan Atkinson, it has Ben Miller. How would you not be entertained?

#3 “Green Street” (2005)

The gulf between critic and audience rating for this football-hooligan drama is almost staggering, scoring 48% and 87% respectively. Seen as derivative, predictable and over violent by its fault-finders, cinema goers were pleasantly surprised by its “Fight-Club”-style story and entertainment value. Featuring a rather unexpected role by Middle Earth’s very own Elijah Wood, who plays a Harvard dropout living in England, there are plenty of scraps and some surprisingly emotional moments. But the biggest question is this: Where’s Samwise when you really need him?

#2: “The Inbetweeners Movie” (2011)

Whilst many commentators couldn’t see past this film’s ‘lads lads lads’ vibe, it has gained an army of fans nonetheless. A big screen adaptation from the popular television series, this Brits-abroad comedy sees Will, Simon, Neil and Jay head to sunny Malia, a notorious Greek holiday hotspot, and favourite destination for British sun-seekers. Much like the series, “The Inbetweeners Movie” is highly awkward, occasionally offensive and extremely cringeworthy. So, it offers everything everyone expected. That it got a critical drubbing is arguably quite fitting – this lot are social outcasts to the end!

#1: “Kevin and Perry Go Large” (2000)

We’re staying in sunny climates for this Harry Enfield and Kathy Burke classic. Rather bizarrely, it rates 0% on Rotten Tomatoes, with critics apparently hating it across the board. Maybe they just didn't see it? Because it rates at 70% with audiences, and has carved its own corner in British pop culture. Based on two of the most popular characters from the '90s sketch show, “Harry Enfield and Chums”, the titular twosome fulfil their dreams by heading to Ibiza. Nostalgic, quotable, downright silly, and all-out hilarious, everything about it is synonymous with the late-90s British rave scene. The Rotten Tomatoes reviewers clearly weren’t there!
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