Top 10 Helpful Dead Movie Characters

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Top 10 Helpful Dead Movie Characters

VOICE OVER: Ryan Wild WRITTEN BY: Garrett Alden
Calling all ghosts, holograms, and hallucinations! For this list, we'll be going over film characters who gave aid to the protagonists despite being dead. Our countdown includes “The Lion King”, “Thor: Ragnarok”, "Harry Potter", and more!
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Top 10 Movie Allies From Beyond the Grave


Welcome to WatchMojo and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the Top 10 Movie Allies From Beyond the Grave.

For this list, we’ll be going over film characters who gave aid to the protagonists despite being dead. They can be ghosts, holograms, or even hallucinations, but they need to be dead at the time they assist the heroes. Since some of these characters being dead can constitute spoilers, beware of them going forward.

If there’s a ghostly ally you wish you could resurrect onto our list, help us out by telling us in the comments!

#10: Mufasa

“The Lion King” (1994)
Mufasa is one of the titular Lion Kings. The father of Simba, Mufasa delivers sage advice to his prince to prepare him for life and ruling one day. Tragically, Mufasa dies by the paws of his brother, Scar, who usurps the throne. Simba goes into exile and tries to run away from his responsibilities. However, thanks to some peculiar advice from the wise, if-unhinged Rafiki, Simba comes to see that his father lives on in him. Oh, and he’s also visited by the ghost of Mufasa in a huge bank of clouds. Mufasa helps remind his son that who he is now isn’t all he was or could be. Good advice and delivered in an unforgettable style!


#9: Amanda Krueger

“A Nightmare on Elm Street” franchise (1984-)
The mother of series antagonist Freddy Krueger, Amanda Krueger was a nun. After suffering the traumatic events of Freddy’s conception and learning of his eventual crimes, Amanda took her own life. But after her death, she returned in spirit form to aid those who fought against the dream demon her son became. This took the form of advice on Freddy’s weaknesses and his history, as well as a more direct role. Few people can match Freddy Krueger in direct conflict, but his mother is one of the few people he has ever feared.

#8: Auguste Gusteau

“Ratatouille” (2007)
Remy the rat dreams of becoming a chef, and the chef he looks up to most is Auguste Gusteau. While Gusteau is already dead, Remy frequently imagines the departed master as his own conscience. Whenever Remy is lost or just alone with his thoughts, he speaks to the spirit of Gusteau he imagines. While Gusteau often points out that he’s not real, he still manages to guide Remy in pursuing his dreams as well as in realizing that he doesn’t have to pretend to be someone he isn’t. And that’s one of the greatest dishes anyone can prepare for themselves.


#7: Dr. Malcolm Crowe

“The Sixth Sense” (1999)
We told you there would be spoilers! Although really, who doesn’t know this twist by now? Dr. Malcolm Crowe is a child psychologist. He’s also dead, though he doesn’t realize it. Still, this doesn’t stop him from taking on a new patient – Cole Sear. Cole is a young boy who, famously, sees and speaks to dead people. Although Dr. Crowe at first believes Cole is imagining it, he eventually believes him and helps the boy come to see his gift in a new light. And in helping Cole, Malcolm is able to resolve his own unfinished business and move on.

#6: Odin

“Thor: Ragnarok” (2017)
The King of Asgard and father to Thor, Loki, and Hela, Odin is a wise and powerful man, though he has made his share of mistakes. His treatment of his villainous daughter Hela comes back to haunt both him and his sons upon his death though. Hela escapes her prison and takes over Asgard, leading to Thor confronting her and losing an eye, and nearly much more. Beaten senseless by her, Thor has a vision of Odin, who reminds him that his hammer is not the source of his powers and that Thor is even stronger than he is. This encouragement causes Thor to let loose and become the God of Thunder we all knew he could be.


#5: Jor-El

“Man of Steel” (2013)
While we’re on the subject of ghost dads, Jor-El is famously the father of Kal-El, a.k.a. Clark Kent, a.k.a. Superman. Despite dying on Krypton, Jor-El manages to create a facsimile of his consciousness, which he left on the ship he sent Clark to Earth on. This allows the long-dead father to instruct his son in his people’s history, as well as explain his hopes for Kal. The A.I. is also able to give aid to Lois Lane and his son when they’re captured by General Zod. Jor-El has one last confrontation with Zod himself. Although Zod seemingly destroys him, Jor-El achieves everything he wanted to by helping his son save Earth.


#4: James & Lily Potter

“Harry Potter” franchise (2001-11)
Although ghosts pervade this franchise, and as tempted as we were to discuss the girls’ toilet ghost, Moaning Myrtle, we elected to choose departed characters with a closer connection to Harry Potter. The parents of the titular character, James and Lily Potter die by the dark wizard Voldemort’s wand when Harry was just a baby. Still, because of the magic that pervades the series, Harry actually encounters them, despite the fact that they’re deceased. Although some of their interactions are limited to seeing, in some cases, their spirits meet and encourage their son during his toughest battles against Voldemort. Sometimes moral support is what pushes heroes to do what they need to do.


#3: Obi-Wan Kenobi

“Star Wars” franchise (1977-)
Although Yoda, also a good choice would be, elected to talk about Obi-Wan we have. The quintessential wise old mentor figure, at least on film, Obi-Wan Kenobi dies during a duel with Darth Vader. However, following his death, the Force allows Obi-Wan to give counsel to Luke Skywalker, first as a voice and then by appearing to him, and later Yoda. Even if he has to apologize for some of his past mistakes (we’re looking at you “from a certain point of view”), Obi-Wan still does his best to help Luke complete his training from the afterlife. And like the Force, Obi-Wan will be with Luke – always.

#2: The Army of the Dead [aka the Dead Men of Dunharrow]

“The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” (2003)
When trying to save Gondor from the massive forces of Sauron, the would-be heir Aragorn needs all the help he can get. To save the living, he turns to the dead. More specifically, to an army of men his ancestor cursed for not fulfilling their oaths to him. Although they take some convincing, the Dead Men of Dunharrow come to Gondor’s aid, arriving at the last minute to sweep over the orcs and evil men like a wave – since they can’t die or even be touched. If we were ranking based purely on how strong they are, this army would easily take the top spot. But our number 1 entry has had a big impact on pop culture.

Before we get to our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions:

Dr. Alfred Lanning, “I, Robot” (2004)
This Scientist Leaves Behind a Computer Program in His Image to Uncover a Conspiracy

Tala, “Moana” (2016)
This Ghostly Grandma Helps Show Moana Her Path


Elvis Presley, “True Romance” (1993)
A Hallucination or Ghost of the King Advises Clarence... Yes, Really!

Littlefoot’s Mother, “The Land Before Time” (1988)
The Mama Dino Appears as a Cloud to Guide Her Son to Safety

Sam Wheat, “Ghost” (1990)
This Ghost Uncovers His Murderers & Helps Save His Girl

#1: Jacob Marley & the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, & Future / Yet to Come

“A Christmas Carol” (1916-)
Quite possibly some of the most famous fictional ghosts ever created, this quartet of ghosts appears to Ebenezer Scrooge. Marley, Scrooge’s former partner, warns him against his stingy and misanthropic attitude. Scrooge is then shown visions by the three unnamed ghosts, of the past, present, and future. The spirits take Scrooge on a tour of events from his past that remind him of why he became the way he is, as well as revealing more about the woes of people close to him that he could improve. Lastly, Scrooge is given a look at his legacy, should he remain as unpleasant as he has been. While the ghosts’ appearances and personalities vary from adaptation to adaptation, their lessons remain timeless.
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