Related Videos

Top 10 Queens of the Stone Age Songs

VO: Rebecca Brayton
Script written by Brittany Vincent. Formed in 1996 in Palm Desert, California, Queens of the Stone Age has made a name for themselves thanks to their stoner rock sound, which includes a riff-heavy style and elements of alternative rock. For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. Howling guitars, layered instrumentation, haunting vocals, and great songwriting are the order of the day, and if you weren’t a fan before, you probably will be after you check out a few of these songs. Join WatchMojo.com as we count down our picks for the top 10 Queens of the Stone Age songs. Special thanks to our users Diogo Ferro, Jesse Adler Goonerage, Nicky Crews, Leboyo56, lainguy167, cantasaurus_rex, kyle.cannon and NH61 for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
Share
WatchMojo

You must register to a corporate account to download this video. Please login

Transcript
Script written by Brittany Vincent.

Top 10 Queens of the Stone Age Songs


This rock band just goes with the flow. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Queens of the Stone Age songs.

For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. Howling guitars, layered instrumentation, haunting vocals, and great songwriting are the order of the day, and if you weren’t a fan before, you probably will be after you check out a few of these songs.

#10: “Smooth Sailing”
…Like Clockwork (2013)

“Smooth Sailing” is a raunchy, groovy rock song with an infectious riff and Josh Homme’s manic falsetto in full effect. With Dave Grohl of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame on the drum kit for the first time since 2002’s Songs for the Deaf, the band swaggers through the song with unshakable confidence. Listen up for Josh’s solo after the second verse, a twisted, bluesy romp that sounds like the musical equivalent of a shot of tequila and a Camel Blue. “Smooth” is right.

#9: “First It Giveth”
Songs for the Deaf (2002)

This rocker off the breakthrough concept album Songs for the Deaf is an intense piece, striking a middle ground between the radio friendliness of the album’s other two singles, and the heavier direction many of the other songs take. It focuses on the impact drugs have on the songwriting process. Inspired by a Bible quotation, the hard rockin’ stoner track reached the UK top 40 and was accompanied by a music video memorable for showcasing Nick Oliveri’s nude bass playing.

#8: “Sick, Sick, Sick”
Era Vulgaris (2007)

Era Vulgaris remains the most critically polarizing record Queens has released, because it’s by far their most experimental. “Sick, Sick, Sick” is the second track off the album, and it is a monster. Dirty, distorted, and mean, it features Homme and second guitarist Troy Van Leeuwen slamming away at a riff fuzzier and dirtier than the carpet of a New Jersey Motel 6. Homme spits flirtatious venom into the microphone, weaving a tale of lust that’s so, so wrong, but feels so, so right.

#7: “Mexicola”
Queens of the Stone Age (1998)

“Mexicola” is a fan favorite from the band’s debut album. Performed in the mammoth sounding C-Standard tuning that Josh so often employed while a member of influential stoner rock band Kyuss, this song is a blast of withering desert heat. The rhythm is relentless, and Josh’s voice sails right over the top of it all, riding the riff instead of competing with it. Homme named this style “robot rock,” expressing the desire to make their music instantly recognizable. Seems like he did a great job.

#6: “Better Living Through Chemistry”
Rated R (2000)

Rated R was the beginning of a clear stylistic separation from Kyuss, Josh’s previous band. Featuring a much fuller lineup than the first album, things take a turn for the bizarre as soon as you hit the play button. “Better Living Through Chemistry” is a sprawling, echo-ey affair held together by Nick Oliveri’s thundering bass. At turns driven, at others melancholy and wandering, it somehow manages to feel heavy and airy at the same time, a combination that is to this day perplexing and hypnotic.

#5: “I Appear Missing”
…Like Clockwork (2013)

Though …Like Clockwork isn’t the heaviest album Queens has recorded, it’s the most thematic by far. “I Appear Missing” is the record’s penultimate track, and it is the wreckage that follows in the wake of the debauchery of “Smooth Sailing.” The song lopes, a wounded soul pressing on through some immense hardship, trembling under the weight of depression and loss. The tension builds and builds, culminating in a soaring guitar solo, and a pained vocal refrain before segueing right into the dark final track.

#4: “The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret”
Rated R (2000)

With bouncy, descending verses and big crunchy choruses, “The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret” became Queens’ most well-known song upon release, and for good reason. It earned radio airplay through its catchy and sexy sound, but it’s the bizarre accents that make it a Queens of the Stone Age song. Muted, punky rhythm guitars and a whole host of strange instruments below and above make for an infectious and unforgettable tune, perfect for any acid-tripping secret agent.

#3: “Little Sister”
Lullabies to Paralyze (2005)

For many fans, this was their first introduction to the world of Queens of the Stone Age. It sees Josh Homme embracing his punk rock roots, and leading the band in a one take recording that’s packed to the gills with gnarly guitar tone and the most important element of all: cowbell. Alright, so a jam block was actually used for the studio recording, but the cowbell’s since been incorporated into live shows following a SNL performance. “Little Sister” is hard-hitting and fast-paced, making it an adrenaline-filled ride from beginning to end. To this day, the song is a live staple, and never fails to get the crowd dancing along.

#2: “Go with the Flow”
Songs for the Deaf (2002)

“Go with the Flow” is possibly the single most radio-friendly song Queens has ever produced. It’s a deceptively simple tune, relying on one chord for the majority of its running time. What makes it so great is the layering of instruments, every single one performing a small but necessary part in creating what may well be the best driving song the 21st century has produced thus far. It was nominated for a Grammy, and is, of course, a staple of the band’s live shows.

Before we unveil our number one spot, here are a few honorable mentions.
- “Regular John”
Queens of the Stone Age (1998)
- “You Think I Ain’t Worth a Dollar, But I Feel Like a Millionaire”
Songs for the Deaf (2002)
- “Burn the Witch”
Lullabies to Paralyze (2005)
- “I Sat by the Ocean”
…Like Clockwork (2013)
- “Make It wit Chu”
Era Vulgaris (2007)

#1: “No One Knows”
Songs for the Deaf (2002)

If you’re a Queens fan, then the song that takes top honors likely comes as no surprise to you. “No One Knows” is undeniable. It’s catchy, sexy, complex, and it flat out rocks. Crunchy guitar riffs jabbing in over Nick Oliveri’s unstoppable freight train bass playing and Dave Grohl’s drums meld together into a rhythm so primal and groovy that it practically shakes your hips for you. Both a live show constant and a radio repeat, the Grammy-nominated “No One Knows” is everything that makes the band so fantastic, boiled down into one song.

Do you agree with our list? Are you ready to get lost in some sweaty desert rock yet? What’s your favorite Queens of the Stone Age song? For more electrifying Top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
Comments

Sign in to access this feature

Related Blogs