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Top 10 Red Dwarf Episodes


Written by Richard Bush What the smegging hell was that? Welcome to WatchMojoUK and today we will be counting down our picks for the greatest curry-filled, hologram-crammed intergalactic episodes from the brilliant TV series that is “Red Dwarf”. A series spanning 30 years and counting, it has become one of the most loved sci-fi shows around, with cult characters just as ludicrous as its plot lines are ridiculous. But which episodes reign supreme? Special thanks to our users RatchetSkids, Dashiesparkle and mac121mr0 for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Red Dwarf Episodes


What the smegging hell was that? Welcome to WatchMojoUK and today we will be counting down our picks for the greatest curry-filled, hologram-crammed intergalactic episodes from the brilliant TV series that is “Red Dwarf”.

A series spanning 30 years and counting, it has become one of the most loved sci-fi shows around, with cult characters just as ludicrous as its plot lines are ridiculous. But which episodes reign supreme?

#10: Backwards
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


Wormholes, black holes and even white holes are a common sight in “Red Dwarf”, so the guys should be used to a quick time jump. But something in this episode isn't quite right, mainly, the 1993 they’ve travelled back to is backwards. Boxes fall onto trucks, guns suck bullets out of people, deodorant keeps you sweaty and when you go the toilet, well.. An excellent example of the crew interacting with a shape-shifting environment, “Backwards” is packed full of memorable quotes and physical comedy, including a particularly satisfying bar brawl that acts as a clean up montage.

#9: Marooned
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


In what is essentially a glorified bottle episode, Marooned sees Rimmer and Lister stranded on an icy planet, with only each other and the bitter cold for company. Unlike many other crazed and varied episodes in the series, Marooned focuses more on the relationship between the two unlikely friends as they reminisce over a burning barrel and fight for survival. Of course, unforgettably witty dialogue is sprinkled throughout, but the sheer stripped back nature of it reminds us that it’s the great writing and razor-sharp characters that make this series so epic and not necessarily its deep-space setting.

#8: The Inquisitor
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


On the surface, this episode looks a little heavy, religious and, well, downright intense for something typical “Red Dwarf”. The famed Inquisitor, a simulant with a God Complex, visits Red Dwarf and acts as judge, jury and executioner to those who have lead worthless lives - so our crew are sitting ducks. Forcing them to reflect on their own existences, we get to see the team try and worm their way out of certain death, with the most impressive candidate undoubtedly being Rimmer. And even though, as the Inquisitor's case builds, we see he’s got a point, we can’t help but love the guys and all of their dysfunctional ways.

#7: Queeg
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


Ever had a computer virus, a narky school teacher or an annoying older brother? This is kind of like that. With long-serving Red Dwarf computer Holly on the blink, the Dwarfers turn to back-up system Queeg 500 to help run the ship - unknowing of the systems rigorous ways of keeping crew members in check. Played brilliantly by an intimidating Charles Augins, the guys do everything from cleaning floors to running laps, which makes life onboard agony. In comparison, the ditsy Holly starts to look better than ever, and we get to watch a gruelling chess game as the loveable computer fights his way back to the top spot. But Holly knows what he’s doing, don’t worry.

#6: Better Than Life
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


With virtual reality creeping into our lives more and more, never has this episode been so on point. In this outing, the crew delve into the virtual reality programme Better Than Life to live out their deepest fantasies, be it beautiful women or, in Lister’s case, a caviar vindaloo and rare wine in a pint glass. Of course, Rimmer and his neurotic personality ruins it for the rest of them, as he conjures up an emotionally aggressive mirage of his dad, a mortgage and deadly ants that are about to eat his face. This episode is littered with lots of little gems and one liners that have had viewers tuning into repeats for years.

#5: White Hole
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


Time loops are a recurring theme in “Red Dwarf”, we see it in the episode Future Echoes, but never quite as hilariously executed as in White Hole. With time spewing back into the universe and resulting in multiple time loops at seemingly random intervals, we are treated to comical, and at times frustrating, conversations between the crew. This episode also sees the birth of a stubborn talking toaster and Cat’s unforgettable “So what is it?” line. A Dwarf classic that will have you frantically sketching timelines in a notepad, you can’t help but think about it when you get deja vu. You can't help but think about it when you get deja vu. Wait, what just happened?

#4: Polymorph
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


Ah yes, Polymorph, “Alien” meets “The Thing” meets “Red Dwarf”. How do you stop a shape-shifting mutant that can turn into anything? With great difficulty. Whether it’s morphing into a snake, giant monster or Lister’s undies, the Polymorph makes for interesting TV. Feeding on negative emotions, the creature changes the personalities of our crew members, making Kryten a defiant teenager and Cat a scruffy bum. One of the most memorable monsters in the series, it reminds us that in space, you can never really trust anyone or anything.

#3: Gunmen of the Apocalypse
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


Who doesn't love a western? On a mission to cure Kryten of a computer virus, Lister, Rimmer and Cat enter the mechanoids’ subconscious, which just so happens to look like the ruthless streets of a spaghetti western. Brimming with film references and colourful characters, including Brett Riverboat, knife extraordinaire, and Dangerous Dan McGrew, who just wants some ginger ale, we get to watch the Red Dwarf comedy formula play out in one of cinema’s most memorable settings. Sci-Fi mixed with a western mixed with comedy - what could be better?

#2: Quarantine
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


Just when you thought Rimmer couldn't get any more irritating, he contracts the holo-virus, puts on a checkered dress and starts terrorizing the crew. After returning from a trip in Starbug, the guys are sent to quarantine by Rimmer, who seems to be acting a little odd. As the virus eats away at Rimmer’s sanity, he defers to his assistant in crime, Mr Flibble, to make life even harder for his crewmates, cutting off their oxygen and trying to zap them with his hex vision. It’s a good job Lister had access to the luck virus to get them out of the tight spot.

Before we reveal our top pick, here area few honourable mentions.

Legion
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)

Krytie TV
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)

The End
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)

#1: Back to Reality
“Red Dwarf” (1988-)


What if “Red Dwarf” was all a virtual reality computer game - and Lister, Rimmer, Cat and Kryten were the players? Cue Back to Reality. During a dangerous investigation of a wreckage, the guys suddenly wake up in a simulator, where they’ve apparently spent the last four years playing the game “Red Dwarf”. Now back to their real lives, they have to come to terms with who they are, be it a fascist police chief like Lister, homeless Rimmer or goofball Cat. It’s yet another example of writers Rob Grant and Doug Naylor creating another compelling stage for great characters to perform on, and it reminds us that it doesn't matter where they are, what timeline they are in, the Dwarfers will always be our favourite space comedy crew.
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