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Top 10 British Brands That Took Over The World

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Written by Richard Bush They’re big - and they’re British. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top ten British brands that took over the world! For this list, we are looking at those instantly recognisable British, or part-British brands that have managed to break the UK barrier and gain success worldwide. To qualify, they will also need to have had a significant influence on the history and culture of their respective industries. Special thanks to our user WordToTheWes for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 British Brands That Took Over The World


They’re big - and they’re British. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top ten British brands that took over the world!

For this list, we are looking at those instantly recognisable British, or part-British brands that have managed to break the UK barrier and gain success worldwide. To qualify, they will also need to have had a significant influence on the history and culture of their respective industries.

#10: Dr. Martens


These are more than just a footwear brand. Since they hit the mainstream, they’ve been a symbol for nonconformists worldwide - a bit like the leather jacket for our feet. But they’ve not just favoured been favoured by punk rockers, scooter riders and rebellious teenagers, they’ve also become the go-to, reliable footwear for postmen and factory workers thanks to their durability. Launching an accompanying clothing range in 2011, it was ranked in 2012 as the eighth fastest-growing British company.

#9: ASOS


If you’re a 20 something who’s into their fashion, then you’ll no doubt be acquainted with the online store ASOS. A hub for over 850 different brands, if you can’t quite find that jacket, bracelet or pair of shoes you’ve been looking for on the high-street, ASOS is your go-to. It’s been around since the early noughties, but it wasn't until the brand went international in 2010 that it really took off, with US, Italian and Spanish websites, and offices in Australia and New York.

#8: Glenfiddich


Yes, the more commercially verbose American brands like Jack Daniels and Jim Beam may be more recognisable, but for many, Glenfiddich is the godfather of whisky. The famous scotch, which hails from Dufftown in Scotland, is the world’s best-selling single-malt whisky and is sold in 180 countries. With a long list of accolades, including a successful stint at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition, its 15-year aged moonshine, has become an affordable, yet highly-refined favourite. Great scot.

#7: Burberry


Britain is bursting with iconic fashion brands, including the likes of Paul Smith and Ted Baker, but our vote goes to Burberry, a name established back in 1856. Originally focussed on outdoor clothing, with its trench coats worn by soldiers in the First World War, it eventually moved up market - and its distinctive, highly-copied checked pattern moved with it. With stores across the globe, from Europe, to America, and Asia to Africa, it really is one of the fashion heavyweights.

#6: Rolls-Royce


Cars are another British specialism, from mud-plugging Land Rovers to gadget-heavy Aston Martins. But as far as universally-acknowledged automotive luxury goes, Rolls-Royce is the one to beat. Known for its ridiculously bespoke, hand-made models, Rollers have long been the high-class car of choice, amongst footballers and business moguls alike. And it’s not just Brits with money who buy them. In fact, the US is Rolls-Royce’s biggest market, followed by China.

#5: Royal Dutch Shell


A dual-listed oil and gas company, it was established in 1907 when the Shell Transport and Trading Company joined forces with the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company. Since then, it’s gone on to become one of the top ten largest corporations in the world, with multiple subsidiaries, including the US, which is its largest. Hailed as one of the big oil supermajors, Shell has been fueling houses and cars for a century and has one of the most recognisable logos ever.

#4: Durex


Although there are many popular condom brands, Durex is easily the most famous. Originally manufactured by SSL International, which is now owned by the health, hygiene and home products company Reckitt Benckiser, Durex’s history dates back more than a century, and it made massive product advances in the '90s. In a similar way to “Hoover”, “Chapstick” or “Sellotape” and their respective markets, Durex is so popular, it is commonly used as an interchangeable name for a condom.

#3: BBC


A leading provider of news coverage, documentary, films, charity events and radio stations, it’s easy to forget that the British Broadcasting Corporation is in fact a brand itself. Becoming a highly-respected name - and as a result, a stamp of almost unparalleled approval in the British media - the BBC is the world’s largest national broadcasting organisation. And thanks to its BBC Worldwide subsidiary, it has offshoots all over the world, including BBC America, BBC Canada and the 24-hour international news channel, BBC World News.

#2: Virgin


From record shops to space travel, Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Group has its fingers in many different pies. As a company always looking to explore new ventures, the Virgin brand has grown exponentially since the 70s, and is prominent in many facets of media, be it music or home entertainment. Not only is Virgin a brand that pops up all over the globe, but its plane, train, cruise liner and Galactic services, will help you travel our world and hopefully others.

#1: Cadbury


We all know Cadbury is big, but you may not realise just how big it is. Founded in Birmingham almost two centuries ago, its reach stretches to the US, Canada, Australia and India. In fact, it’s the second-largest confectionery brand in the world, second only to Wrigley’s chewing gum. Of course, it’s most famous for its chocolate - with the likes of the Dairy Milk bar, Flake and Curly Wurly - but thanks to its acquisition of other brands like Maynards in the 90s, it also produces an array of other sweets, like Jelly Babies. Now, that’s some tasty trivia.
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