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Top 10 Most Difficult Songs To Sing

VO: Adrian Sousa WRITTEN BY: George Pacheco
Written by George Pacheco Yeah, we do NOT recommend picking any of these songs for your next karaoke session! Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we're counting down our picks for the Top 10 Most Difficult Songs to Sing!  For this list, we'll be ranking the most challenging songs for the average person, or even a trained vocalist, to sing. They could possess complex arrangements, quick wordplay, or some seriously stratospheric notes. Note: we'll be omitting rap songs, as they deserve to be featured in a list of their own. Like our videos? Head over to WatchMojo.comsuggest to submit your own video ideas today!
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Top 10 Most Difficult Songs to Sing

 
Yeah, we do NOT recommend picking any of these songs for your next karaoke session! Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we're counting down our picks for the Top 10 Most Difficult Songs to Sing! 

For this list, we'll be ranking the most challenging songs for the average person, or even a trained vocalist, to sing. They could possess complex arrangements, quick wordplay, or some seriously stratospheric notes. Note: we'll be omitting rap songs, as they deserve to be featured in a list of their own.
 
 

#10: "Wuthering Heights" (1978)
Kate Bush

 
Kate Bush possesses an extraordinary voice and progressive visual style, which earned her acclaim from both fans and critics. "Wuthering Heights" serves as Bush's biggest hit, and with good reason, as it sets on full display all of the singer's incredible vocal range. The song has been recorded twice by Bush, and both versions are melodic masterpieces which hinge on Bush's soaring vocals from the song's sparse intro right on through to the booming chorus. Finally, Bush lets it rip alongside the song's lead guitar-accompanied outro, proving her place as a member of art rock royalty with a performance which still evokes chills today.
 
 
 

#9: "Unchained Melody" (1965)
The Righteous Brothers

 
"Unchained Melody" was written in 1955, and has been performed by a number of different artists over the years.It's the version recorded a decade later by The Righteous Brothers which has since gone on to become the definitive version, however, thanks largely in part to Bobby Hatfield's soaring vocal performance. "Unchained Melody" actually starts off quite slow and somber, but Hatfield soon kicks things up with a level of emotion which is completely raw and delivered with unbelievable passion. Oh, and once the drums kick in around the two minute mark? Forget about it; there isn't a dry eye in the house. 
 
 
 

#8: "Dream On" (1973)
Aerosmith

 
A good power ballad can be a wonderful thing, and once in a while it can even define a band's career. Proof of this can be seen in the career of Aerosmith, who scored a massive, iconic hit with this track from their 1973 self-titled debut. "Dream On" is another slow burn of sorts, a sensitive song composed in F minor which reaches a crescendo a little past the halfway mark as Steven Tyler's measured vocals duel with Joe Perry's lead guitar . Tyler's powerful scream serves as the linchpin of "Dream On," a gold standard against which many other classic rock singers have been measured.
 
 
 

#7: "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" (2003)
The Darkness

 
The spirit of classic Thin Lizzy lived on within the classic rock style of England's The Darkness, although the falsetto singing style of Darkness frontman Justin Hawkins was probably the furthest thing from Phil Lynott's bluesy howl. "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" was The Darkness' biggest international hit, and quickly became infamous for Hawkins' trouser-pinching vocal approach. Not everyone can pull off an ultra-high falsetto with the sort of conviction Hawkins musters throughout this twin-guitar epic, but Justin nails it with style and sleaze to spare. 
 
 
 

#6: "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going" (1982)
Jennifer Holliday

 
Power. This is perhaps how best to describe "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going," a key song from the Broadway hit "Dreamgirls." The song earned Jennifer Holliday a Tonyand a Grammy Award in 1982 for her absolutely inspiring performance, while Jennifer Hudson would also score a hit with her take on the film version in 2006. The song is incredibly difficult for even the most seasoned singer to perform, as it never lets up for a second, demanding range, tone and, yes, POWER to do "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going" the justice it deserves. Luckily, Holliday had all of these qualities and more, delivering the vocal performance of a lifetime.
 
 
 

#5: "All By Myself" (1996)
Celine Dion

 
The next song on our list is another with a long history of cover versions after its original artist, Eric Carmen, adapted it from a Rachmaninoff concerto in 1975 . Carmen's "All By Myself" is still remembered fondly today, but it's Celine Dion's 1996 version which is even more vocally impressive, as she hits an immensely powerful high note shortly before the three minute mark, turning what was initially a great pop song, into a tour de force for the French-Canadian singer to shine. Trust us when we say that you do NOT want to attempt this one at karaoke. 
 
 
 
 

#4: "Bohemian Rhapsody" (1975)
Queen

 
There are many reasons why Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" is an incredibly difficult song for just about anyone to sing. For starters, it's composed in multiple keys, and shifts styles and tempos from a ballad arrangement, to operatic accompaniment and straight up hard rock. Then, there's the nature of the vocals, which consist of all four members of Queen layering their tracks in the studio to create a larger-than-life atmosphere. There are high falsettos, deep basses and hard rock screams to tackle, all combined by lead singer Freddie Mercury and company . Simply stated: Mercury was an inimitable vocal talent, and only the bravest singers should even attempt at laying their stamp on this one. 
 
 
 

#3: "Emotions" (1991)
Mariah Carey

 
It's not an exaggeration to describe Mariah Carey as one of the foremost vocal talents of her generation. Her prowess as a singer has been well documented over a career which has spanned almost thirty years, including such hits as "Vision of Love," "Honey" and "Hero." "Emotions" might be the ultimate Mariah Carey jam, however, one which showcases the singer's uncanny ability to reach glass-shattering high notes. The song is also a great example of the sort of light and breezy R&B which dominated charts in the 90s, yet is punctuated by Carey's charm and charisma, while her vocal histrionics steal the show from any pretender who might lay claim to her throne. 
  
 
 
 

#2: "Lovin' You" (1975)
Minnie Riperton

 
Minnie Riperton was the OG when it comes to striking gold with this sort of approach, as evidenced by "Lovin' You" and its chart-topping success back in 1975. The song is backed by a sunny keyboard performance from Stevie Wonder, while Riperton sings a sweet ode to love and sex that hits the stratosphere when she hits those famous whistle notes. Fun fact: Minnie Riperton is actually Maya Rudolph's mother, and can be heard singing her daughter's name during the outro on unedited and album versions of the song. 
 


 
Before we name our number one pick, here are a few honorable mentions!
 


"Chandelier" (2014)
Sia



"You Raise Me Up" (2003)
Josh Groban 
 
 
 
"Listen" (2006)
Beyonce

 

#1: "I Will Always Love You" (1992)
Whitney Houston

 
We're not taking anything away from the absolutely killer original version of "I Will Always Love You," recorded by country legend Dolly Parton in 1973. For many, however, it's the arrangement Whitney Houston used for the 1992 film "The Bodyguard" which serves as the most well known. Houston used Linda Ronstadt's 1975 cover as a basis for her version, yet she ultimately makes it her own, thanks to an incredible vocal performance. Houston's uncanny ability to balance vulnerability and power not only makes "I Will Always Love You" a stone cold classic, but it served as a defining, pivotal moment of Houston's career as one of the great, all time singers. 
  



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