Related Videos

Top 10 Overhyped British Films


Written by Warren Holmes Hype can be crucial to a film’s success, but too much and the movie falls short of expectations. Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 overhyped British movies. For this list, we’re looking at films that are a full or part-British production, or have significant levels of British involvement, and ranking them on how disappointing they were in comparison to the pre-release excitement they generated. While we’re not suggesting that these films are outright awful, they weren’t quite worth the fuss that was made for them. Special thanks to our user RichardFB for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
Share
WatchMojo

You must register to a corporate account to download this video. Please login

Transcript

Top 10 Overhyped British Movies


Hype can be crucial to a film’s success, but too much and the movie falls short of expectations. Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 overhyped British movies.

For this list, we’re looking at films that are a full or part-British production, or have significant levels of British involvement, and ranking them on how disappointing they were in comparison to the pre-release excitement they generated. While we’re not suggesting that these films are outright awful, they weren’t quite worth the fuss that was made for them.

#10: “Murder on the Orient Express” (2017)

It all looked so promising... But this Kenneth Branagh version of Agatha Christie’s famous whodunit never quite gains momentum. The efforts of the all-star cast are commendable, but a distinct lack of pace causes exactly the wrong kind of tension to creep in, especially after those pivotal but painfully lacklustre interrogation scenes. Branagh’s mannered and pantomime-esque performance is far from criminal, but he, his distracting moustache and an unnecessarily dreary plot are all at odds with the edgy promos we all watched beforehand. And ultimately, the movie derails with a whimper.

#9: “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” (2017)

The first “Kingsman” film was a largely unexpected treat. But this sequel struggled to match its predecessor. Once we learn that a rejected Kingsman agent is at large, it’s off to America to join forces with our stateside counterparts, to help destroy a global drug cartel. But, what follows is a surprisingly shapeless movie made up of decent individual scenes, but lacking much in the way of overall charm. It’s so busy, that it’s easy to understand why Elton John gets angry, and why Channing Tatum rarely parts with his rifle. The trailers were slick; the movie, not so much.

#8: “The Chronicles Of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” (2005)

Let’s cast Tilda Swinton as the witch, James McAvoy as Mr. Tumnus and have Aslan voiced by Liam Neeson. It’s sure to work! Right? Sadly, not really. There is much to admire here, but perhaps because of the perfection it promised, this trip to Narnia feels all too restrained. The key scenes pass quite nicely, and the final battle is gripping, but the set-up is so long, it’s a relief when the wardrobe door is finally opened. With a 2-and-a-half-hour run time, for a film aimed at children, it’s an epic - but not in a good way.

#7: “Skyfall” (2012)

The James Bond hype machine has been working overtime with recent movies, but never more so than for “Skyfall”. And when all’s said, done and blown to bits, it is a pretty good film. But, is it really the series saviour that it’s made to seem? “Skyfall” looks at times too determined to put Bond back on the action movie map, cramming guns, gadgets and fight scenes to fulfil its quota. But the final result feels a little overblown. Even with the M plot twist, it’s a film that leaves the audience only sort of shaken, and not especially stirred.

#6: “Bridget Jones’s Baby” (2016)

Helen Fielding’s fan favourite novels about a London singleton, plus the first two film adaptations, ensured that the long-awaited return of Bridget to the big screen was one of the biggest movie events of 2016. So much so, that despite the film’s critical and commercial success, it still feels like the love is laid on a little too thick. It’s funny in parts, awkward at others, and increasingly emotional toward the end… But it’s probably not quite the rom-com masterpiece that some initially billed it as. And it’s distinctly lacking in cheesy Hugh Grant scenes.

#5: “Les Misérables” (2012)

With an ensemble cast crammed with A-list actors and an Oscar-winning director in the chair, this “Les Mis” adaptation was almost hailed a triumph before anyone had even seen it. And again, it’s clearly an ambitious and definitely impressive production, to satisfy fans and introduce new audiences to the story. But, though it seemed to be all anyone talked about back in 2012, the film’s staying power hasn’t matched that of other musicals - so far, at least. And despite all the hubbub that originally surrounded it, “Les Mis” probably still looks and sounds slightly better on stage.

#4: “Spice World” (1997)

Rewind to the mid-’90s and the Spice Girls were the biggest band on the planet, conquering all before them with their iconic brand of girl power. And so, they switched CDs for the cinema. “Spiceworld” was announced at the Cannes Film Festival no less, before a whirlwind tour of endless promo leading up to its release. But, what eventually arrived seemed too much like an extended advert for the group, with awkward celebrity cameos at every turn. Yes, “Spice World” is fun, but without an even half-developed story or anything close to convincing performances, it could never match its momentous billing.

#3: “Darkest Hour” (2017)

Gary Oldman’s lead performance as Winston Churchill proved an award-winning tour de force. But this film’s greatest asset actually highlights deficiencies in other areas. During Churchill’s pivotal scenes, the “Darkest Hour” hype feels pretty justified. But, the rest of the movie moves along in a mostly forgettable fashion. Director Joe Wright displays his prowess but, in a tight narrative time frame, the supporting characters fall fairly flat and the wider social context can be lost. Thanks mostly to the Oscar buzz around Oldman, audiences just expected more.

#2: “Slumdog Millionaire” (2008)

Ok, Danny Boyle’s a unique and stylish director. But did this film really deserve an armful of Oscars? Upon release, “Slumdog Millionaire” was widely adored, with the story of orphaned Jamal winning ‘Who Wants to Be A Millionaire?’ pulling on everyone’s heartstrings. But over time, the original praise has muted amidst accusations that the movie trivialises poverty and social issues in India to entertain a western audience. And that upbeat Bollywood-style musical number at the end doesn’t exactly help matters. The Oscar bait has rarely been so blatant.

#1: “The King’s Speech” (2010)

For some, to express even the slightest reservation about this film is tantamount to treason. But strip away the regal design and the award-hunting lead performances, and “The King’s Speech” is far from revolutionary. An emotionally affecting drama, yes. With some memorable moments between Colin Firth’s king and Geoffrey Rush’s therapist. But it feels too much like another example of a film fashioned specifically for the awards season. Would it have been so lauded if it hadn’t so clearly incorporated Oscar-favoured themes? Apologies your majesty, but probably not.
Comments

Sign in to access this feature

Related Blogs