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Top 10 Movie Pubs You Can Actually Visit

VO: Richard Bush WRITTEN BY: Jack Ward
Whose round is it, anyway? Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 movie pubs you can actually visit. For this list, we’re taking an epic pub crawl, stopping off at some of cinema’s finest drinking establishments. But, to make it onto this countdown, the big-screen boozer must also serve as a real-life pub, away from the cameras. So, if you felt so inclined, you could eat, drink and be merry in some of your favourite film locations. Special thanks to our user WordToTheWes for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Movie Pubs You Can Visit


Whose round is it, anyway? Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 movie pubs you can actually visit.

For this list, we’re taking an epic pub crawl, stopping off at some of cinema’s finest drinking establishments. But, to make it onto this countdown, the big-screen boozer must also serve as a real-life pub, away from the cameras. So, if you felt so inclined, you could eat, drink and be merry in some of your favourite film locations.

#10: The Horse And Groom
“The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy” (2005)

The world’s about to end, so best grab your towel and get to your local - and The Beehive in Hertfordshire looks like just the place. This cosy venue served as the Horse and Groom in “Hitchhiker’s Guide”. It’s a traditional free house, with a well-stocked bar, snug sofas and a big telly to watch the footy on - so it’s got all the home comforts that Arthur Dent could ask for. And there’s no need to bring a paper bag.

#9: The Abbey
“Green Street” (2005)

If following in the footsteps of filmic football hooligans is your thing, you can stop by The Abbey for a quick half - only it’s called The Griffin in real-life, and it’s located in Brentford. Although this pub is nowhere near either the Chelsea or West Ham football grounds, it’s still a popular place for footy fans, being one of four bars surrounding Griffin Park - the home of Brentford FC. Especially busy on match days, it does top notch food and boasts an award winning patio.

#8: The Pig and Whistle
“Legend” (2015)

The Krays are two of London’s most infamous figures, both brought to the big screen by Tom Hardy in “Legend”. The brothers were well-connected across the city, and a Kray-owned pub called the Double R Club also features in this film. But we’ve focussed on the famous fight scene, played out at the Pig and Whistle. Off camera, this place is known as Turners Old Star, an historic pub in Wapping and named after the painter, Joseph Turner. Who knew that art history and acute violence could go hand-in-hand.

#7: The Vic & Comet
“Get Carter” (1971)

Directly across from Newcastle Central Station sits the recently-restored Victoria Comet. The building has been used as a pub since the late 1800s, but it was originally two separate hotels. Today it serves food til late, plus a wide variety of whiskeys, a long list of gins, and a stellar selection of world beers and british ales - and you can have your drink in a tall glass, without the funny looks. Cheers, Michael.

#6: The Slaughtered Lamb
“An American Werewolf In London” (1981)

The Black Swan in Ockham is a far cry from its fictional counterpart. Nestled in the idyllic, werewolf-free Surrey countryside, this gastropub was used for interior shots in “An American Werewolf in London” - with exteriors done in North Wales. It sports a rustic decor, with large open fires, plus a picturesque garden. With a long list of real ales and an even longer list of wines, this pub is great when you want to get out of the cold. And it’s pentagram free, of course.

#5: The Green Man
“The Wicker Man” (1973)

The Ellangowan Hotel can be found in Creetown, a small village on the coast in southern Scotland. It was built in 1898, but you might recognise it for the 1973 Christopher Lee classic, “The Wicker Man”. The hotel’s interiors double-up as The Green Man throughout the movie, while further famous scenes were shot in the local area. The region has even hosted a Wickerman Festival in the past, with the Ellangowan serving as a hub for cinematic sight-seers. Summerisle, here we come!

#4: The World’s End
“The World’s End” (2013)

It’s possibly the greatest pub crawl in movie history, and it all leads to this eponymous inn - AKA The WIlbury, in Letchworth Garden City. Formerly known as the Gardeners Arms, this tavern actually renamed itself as “The World’s End” throughout filming for the Cornetto Trilogy comedy, only changing back once Simon Pegg and co. had left. A popular place in its own right, it’s no wonder Gary King holds it in such high esteem. And they keep the alien invasions to a minimum, nowadays.

#3: Samoan Jo’s - The South Seas Bar
“Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels” (1998)

Built in 1923, The Royal Oak on London’s Columbia Road has been a landmark of the local community for a long time. This not-so-Samoan spot sports a large centre bar with a classic atmosphere and modern decor. And despite Jason Statham’s obvious disapproval, it offers a wide range of drinks, too. While the Royal Oak could provide you with a tropically-inspired tipple if needed, there’s a wide range of standard beers to choose from, as well.

#2: The Black Prince
“Kingsman: The Secret Service” (2015)

Manners, Maketh, Man. So, best be on your best behaviour in this pub, although we doubt you’ll meet Colin Firth brandishing a brolly. The Black Prince played host to one of the most memorable fight scenes of modern times, as Eggsy learns of the secret Kingsman amidst a one-sided barroom brawl. The real pub can be found in Kennington, where the regulars tuck into classic Sunday roast with their friends and family. Of course, Eggsy’s given food for thought when he winds up here with Harry - just make sure the man gets to finish his Guinness.

#1: Crosslands
“Trainspotting” (1996)

Today’s winner has been through more renovations than Begbie has had fist-fights! During filming for “Trainspotting” it was known as Crosslands, a working class hangout built into an old church community hall. Years later it was bought and renovated into a nameless, German-themed “hipster” bar, aimed at the middle classes and ‘West Endies’. But that era ended quite quickly, and it’s now The Kelbourne Saint, a contemporary gastropub. Begbie’s balcony still exists, but this place has come a long way since that famous throw of a pint glass.
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