Top 5 Famous Coca-Cola Myths
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Top 5 Famous Coca-Cola Myths

VOICE OVER: Phoebe de Jeu WRITTEN BY: Spencer sher
Forget everything you think you know about this iconic syrupy beverage. For this list, we'll be breaking down the most pervasive myths about Coca-Cola that have been making the rounds for far too long. Welcome to WatchMojo, and today we'll be counting down our picks for the Top 5 Myths About Coca-Cola.
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Top 5 Myths About Coca-Cola

Forget everything you think you know about this iconic syrupy beverage. Welcome to WatchMojo, and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the Top 5 Myths About Coca-Cola.

For this list, we’ll be breaking down the most pervasive myths about Coca-Cola that have been making the rounds for far too long.

#5: Drinking It with Pop Rocks Will Kill You
Anyone who propagates this myth is seriously underestimating the strength of their stomach. The myth first popped up in the late 70s when a rumor began to circulate that “Little Mikey”, a fictional boy played by John Gilchrist in a commercial for Life brand cereal died after he drank a lethal combination of pop rocks and Coca-Cola. The truth is that John Gilchrist is alive and well and that the human stomach is capable of surviving the combination of pop rocks and any carbonated drink. This extends to the other popular Coke myth involving Mentos. Of course, while combining Coke and a mouthful of Mentos won’t KILL you, it definitely won’t feel very good either.

#4: It Used to Be Green
You may have stumbled across this claim online: supposedly, Coke used to be GREEN. Wow, what a crazy world it used to be. Except, of course, that this supposed fact is completely false. The only possible explanation for why this myth came into being is that Coca-Cola has occasionally used green bottles to house its syrupy product. The liquid itself has never been any color other than a rich brown; something that comes from one of its key ingredients: caramel. Back in 1886, when Coke was first hitting the market, the drink’s brown color was the ideal way to mask any potential imperfections; something green wouldn’t have been able to accomplish. Not that it was ever considered anyway, as far as we know.

#3: If You Leave a Tooth in Coke Overnight It Will Dissolve
This myth should have been debunked years ago but for some reason continues to pop up. How in the world could a beverage consumed by millions around the world every day contain acids strong enough to dissolve a human tooth if left to soak overnight? While Coca-Cola does contain acids - edible ones that is – they wouldn’t be powerful enough to turn this myth into a reality. Then again, that doesn’t mean that Coke is GOOD for you, or that those same acids won’t decay your teeth if over-consumed - so as always moderation is the key. If you still don’t believe us go ahead and try it yourself… if you happen to have a spare tooth lying around that is.

#2: It's the Ultimate Cleaning Product
From blood and grease to ketchup and mustard, Coca-Cola is your one stop shop when it comes to cleaning up unsightly spills…or so this myth would have you believe. While it’s true that Coke contains edible acids capable of dissolving stains, it’s hardly an ideal first choice. Coca-Cola is loaded with dyes and will make anything it touches incredibly sticky, so if you must used a carbonated beverage to do your cleaning try to at least find some carbonated water. The problem with this myth is that it continues to expand, with Coke’s magical cleaning powers now extending to removing rust and loosening bolts.

#1: Coke Invented (Modern) Santa Claus
The person that most people think of when they hear the word Santa is actually an amalgamation of various historical figures that dates back hundreds of years. Seeing as how Coke has only been around since 1886 they couldn’t have invented the fictional gift-giver. Second, the idea that Coke came up with Santa’s trademark red clothes and full stomach is ridiculous when you consider the fact that they didn’t use the image in an ad until 1933; a full 10 years after White Rock Beverage’s used a similar looking Santa in their ads, and decades after cartoonist Thomas Nast’s version was making the rounds. Kris Kringle is a man of the people, not some corporate stooge!
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