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Top 10 Major Plot Holes In Cartoons

VO: Phoebe de Jeu WRITTEN BY: William Regot
These contradictions are reminders that cartoons don’t always have consistent logic. Welcome to WatchMojo, and today, we’re counting down our picks for the Top 10 Major Plot Holes in Cartoons. For this list, we’re looking at plot holes that, when looked at closely, don’t hold up. Since we’re addressing plot points in TV series, there are a few spoilers.
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These contradictions are reminders that cartoons don’t always have consistent logic. Welcome to WatchMojo, and today, we’re counting down our picks for the Top 10 Major Plot Holes in Cartoons.

For this list, we’re looking at plot holes that, when looked at closely, don’t hold up. Since we’re addressing plot points in TV series, there are a few spoilers.


#10: Cosmo & Wanda Lost Their Wands “The Fairly OddParents” (2001-17)


In the Season 10 episode, “The Big Fairy Share Scare,” Cosmo and Wanda’s wands fall into a crack that has opened up in the earth, so they are temporarily without wands. However, before Timmy is able to retrieve the wands, Cosmo is shown to be in possession of his wand when he uses it to whip up a film projector that is able to show events from the past. Another inconsistency is found in the episode “Father Time!” when Timmy uses heat vision acquired during a wish to win a footrace, even though “Da Rules,” the rulebook for wishes, would prevent such a thing.




#9: The Mystery of Optimus Prime's Trailer “The Transformers” (1984-87)



For fans of the Generation 1 “Transformers” cartoon, one question has lingered in their minds. When Optimus Prime transforms, where does the trailer from his truck form go? It looks like the trailer rolls off screen as if it were meant to be shed off. There has been speculation as to what happened and some fans think they have answered the question, but no definitive explanation has ever been presented by the show’s creators. While we’re on the subject, why does Megatron turn into a small gun during his transformation?






#8: Omega Dimension “Winx Club” (2004-)


At the end of Season 2, the Trix, a group of three evil witches, are trapped in the Realix Realm after it was closed off. However, in Season 3, we find them in an entirely different location, a notorious prison called the Omega Dimension. It is never explained who transported the Trix to the Omega Dimension, or, more importantly, how anyone could have reached them since there were no more Codex pieces to access Realix. They are dropped off to a new place to set in motion events for Season 3 by freeing the bad guy, Valtor, from the Omega Dimension.






#7: Sam & Tucker Can’t See Youngblood “Danny Phantom” (2004-07)



There are so many plot holes from “Danny Phantom” to choose from, but we’re going to focus on one from the episode “The Fenton Menace.” In this episode, a ghost pirate named Youngblood tells Danny that only kids can see him, which is why the ghost goes unnoticed by Danny’s parents and older sister Jasmine when she’s behaving like an adult. However, Danny’s friends Sam and Tucker aren’t able to see Youngblood when he’s in front of them, even though they act like kids their age.




#6: Summers in Bluffington “Doug” (1991-94; 1996-99)



In the episode “Doug is Hamburger Boy,” Doug’s neighbor Mr. Dink tells him that he is the guy in the hamburger suit who waves at drive thru customers every summer at the Honker Burger. Doug then thinks about how many summers he spent at the Honker Burger, unaware the burger mascot was his neighbor. The only problem is, during the show’s original run on Nickelodeon, Doug had only spent less than a year in Bluffington. So, he didn’t spend one summer in Bluffington, let alone summers. Either Doug is misremembering things, or his imagination is getting out of hand again.




#5: The Ashi Paradox “Samurai Jack” (2001-04; 2017)



There’s nothing like time travel to open up the opportunity for plot holes. In the series finale, Jack is sent back to the past to kill his nemesis Aku. When Aku is killed, it was at a point in time before his daughter Ashi was born, so as a result, Ashi disappears in the future, completely written out of the new timeline. The thing is, Ashi was the one who sent Jack back to the past through her powers. So, if she never existed, how could Jack go back in time to kill Aku, thus preventing Ashi’s birth? This is heavy, Doc.




#4: Brainwashed & No Memory... But They Could Have Just Asked What Happened “Young Justice” (2010-13; 2018-)




At the end of Season 1, the Justice League comes under mind control by the supervillain group the Light, and, during this brief period of time, six members of the League attack the planet Rimbor. Cut to five years later, and the Justice League still has no memory of what they’ve done. However, this problem could have easily been solved if they had just asked people who weren’t under mind control, such as the Green Lantern Corps, what went down. It’s kind of surprising a solution this simple would be lost on a group this intelligent.


#3: Lumpus Isn't a Scoutmaster “Camp Lazlo” (2005-08)


This show’s last episode ends with a strange twist. It turns out that Lumpus, the scoutmaster for Camp Kidney, wasn’t the designated scoutmaster. He was an imposter that had the real scoutmaster locked up in a closet for the summer while he took on the role of scoutmaster. This shocking revelation contradicts information from past episodes, such as the family tree that shows a direct line from Lumpus’ great-grandfather obtaining the rights to Camp Kidney “legally” to Lumpus. It’s also been suggested that Lumpus has been scoutmaster for years, while the supposedly “real” scoutmaster says he was only locked in the closet for the summer, so his story doesn’t add up.


#2: Brian Met Jesus But Is Still an Atheist “Family Guy” (1999-2003; 2005-)


Atheists love to point out the lack of concrete evidence of God’s existence as their reason for disbelieving. However, Brian doesn’t have that excuse. He’s not only met Jesus, he’s also witnessed firsthand Jesus’ ability to perform miracles. There was also the time the plagues of Egypt were visited upon the Griffins, which Brian described as God’s punishment for Peter fraudulently claiming to work miracles. Still, that doesn’t stop Brian in later episodes from not only being a committed atheist, but also looking down on those who believe. C’mon, Brian, at least be an agnostic.




#1: The Real Seymour Skinner “The Simpsons” (1989-)


Let’s put on our “Genius at Work” shirts for this one. The Season 9 episode “The Principal and the Pauper” reveals that the man we thought was Seymour Skinner was an “imposter” whose real name was Armin Tamzarian, a delinquent raised on the tough streets of Capital City. The real Seymour Skinner, had spent all this time as a prisoner of war and a sweatshop worker, and Armin assumed Skinner’s identity when he came back from Vietnam. If this episode were officially cannon, it would discount any flashback or backstory related to Seymour Skinner where he was raised in Springfield by Agnes or served as a sergeant in Vietnam.
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